This summer, COVID-19 safety is more individualized than ever

COVID-19 metrics have been on the rise in the U.S. for about a month now, indicating that we’re experiencing a summer surge. This is pretty unsurprising for many public health experts, as the country has experienced increased transmission during the last three summers. Unlike past years, though, this summer’s surge comes after the end of the federal public health emergency. We now have less data than ever to follow COVID-19 trends, combined with less access to health measures than ever.

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Debt ceiling deal will mean even less COVID-19 funding

In order to reach the debt ceiling deal, Biden had to make a lot of compromises—including limiting funding for COVID-19 and other public health needs. The deal could make it harder for state and local governments to distribute COVID-19 vaccines, track disease through programs like wastewater surveillance, and prepare for future health threats.

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The federal public health emergency ends next week: What you should know

We’re now less than one week out from May 11, when the federal public health emergency (or PHE) for COVID-19 will end. While this change doesn’t actually signify that COVID-19 is no longer worth worrying about, it marks a major shift in how U.S. governments will respond to the ongoing pandemic, including how the disease is tracked and what public services are available. Here’s all the key info you should know about this, in one place.

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COVID-19 is inspiring improvements to surveillance for other common viruses

This week, I have a new story out in Gothamist and WNYCabout norovirus, a nasty stomach bug that appears to be spreading a lot in the U.S. right now. The story shares some NYC-specific norovirus information, but it also talks more broadly about why it’s difficult to find precise data on this virus despite its major implications for public health. Reporting this story led me to reflect on how COVID-19 has revealed cracks in the country’s infrastructure for tracking a lot of common pathogens.

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